Images

In the mid 20th century, gargling was a common practice mandated by many governments and authorities around the globe.

The gargle parade at the Granada, Cinema, Tooting, London, every morning a gargling parade is held by staff, mouthwash against the Flu epidemic.
Experts believe between 50 and 100 million people were killed. More than two-thirds of them died in a single 10-week period in the autumn of 1918.

Never have so many died so swiftly from a single disease. In the United States alone, it killed about 675,000 in about a year – the same number who have died of AIDS in nearly 40 years.

As the country muddles through a particularly nasty flu season – one that the Centers for Disease Control says has killed 24 children in the first three weeks of January and 37 since the start of the flu season – the 1918 nightmare serves a reminder. If a virulent enough strain were to emerge again, a century of modern medicine might not save millions from dying.

As protection against the influenza virus, here are 20 vintage pictures of people are seen gargling with salt and water after a day spent working

A group of children gargle at school to help the prevention of influenza, 1935.
Practicing gargling at the spa resort of the Allier, Vichy, France, ca. 1915.
As protection against the influenza virus, men are seen gargling with salt and water after a day spent working in the War Garden at Camp Dix, New Jersey, September 1918. This was a preventative measure against the influenza epidemic that had spread to army camps.
Children at Sneed Road school gargling as a defense against influenza, 1931.
Staff at the Mutual Property Insurance Co., in London, gargling under the supervision of a trained nurse, teaching the staff to safeguard themselves from influenza, 1932. Hygienic paper cups are used and tablets are also provided
Sailors from the training ship ‘Warspite’ gargling to prevent flu, 1933.
Female telephone operators gargling with disinfectant in London, England, 1933. Protective action of the public authorities to defend influenza.
Two young cadets at the Royal Nautical School, Portishead, Somerset, gargling as a preventative measure against an influenza epidemic, 1934.
A group of children gargle at school to help the prevention of influenza, 1935.
As protection against the influenza virus, men are seen gargling with salt and water after a day spent working in the War Garden at Camp Dix, New Jersey, September 1918. This was a preventative measure against the influenza epidemic that had spread to army camps.

Stop the germs in their tracks. In your mouth, nose and throat before they have a chance to damage your stomach or lungs. 

Gargling Parade

Wellington Barracks

Troops aligned with cups in their hands. Following orders, they sip the fluid and begin gargling (London 1937).